Spotlight on Vermont-woo-hoo!

No time to visit other school libraries in your busy schedule? Wish you could see what your colleagues are doing to embrace “future ready” school library programs? Want to build networking within your region?

Welcome to a new feature of the VSLA website that connects all professional school librarians, tech integrationists, and those who love school libraries in our small, but geographically challenging state. Let’s share our ideas by showcasing what is happening in your school or district. Each month or so, watch for “Spotlight on Vermont,” (not “Moonlight in Vermont”-that’s taken).

Photos, videos, and a peek at innovative programs will open a window into the many ways that school libraries and school librarians are integral and integrated into our educational communities. So often, we avoid the spotlight, and just keep bouncing along like energizer bunnies, but here is a another way to show how school libraries are providing resources and personalizing learning for our diverse learners, and our teaching colleagues. We would love to feature your school library, so let us know if you would like a spotlight. Don’t be shy! If you have a renovated learning space, a neat student centered program, or a collaboration project with other teachers or community members, just contact Judy Kaplan, and she will interview you and write up a spotlight. Press the “easy” button-at least easy for you!


Spotlight on Neshobe School, Brandon, Vermont

By Judy Kaplan



Once again, let’s all take a virtual field trip to another dynamic, future ready school library in Vermont. This time, let’s visit the  Neshobe School Library In Brandon, Vermont.  Neshobe School welcomes 423 pre-K-6 students from Brandon and Goshen.  Situated on the outskirts of the Brandon Town Green, the campus has three buildings that reflect the various stages of community growth over the years.  Along with other Vermont schools, Neshobe’s mission is to provide the best education for local children-a familiar refrain from school to school.


“….We believe in nurturing the hopes and dreams of our students. We believe in ourselves and our colleagues, that working together we can support all students to feel success and make those hopes and dreams a reality.”  https://goo.gl/Qdbf94



Neshobe School Library 2018

https://sites.google.com/rnesu.org/neshobe-library/



The hopes and dreams for Neshobe students are echoed in a large and flexible library learning space that combines multiple areas for class meetings, performance spaces, small group or makerspace work, and quiet reading nooks.  Learners have many choices from an extensive collection of resources, both print and digital.  The active learner centered environment encourages students to take responsibility for their own learning and behavior. Be sure to glance through the slides to get the big picture!  Smiles abound!



Hannah Fjeld, the school librarian since 2014, has energy and enthusiasm for  

the school library program, and was recruited to return to her childhood school by the current principal.  She explains her journey:


My path to becoming a school librarian was a roundabout one. I went to UVM undergrad, majoring in Geography with a minor in Middle East Studies. After UVM I moved to the Pioneer Valley, where I worked with a variety of nonprofits before getting a part-time job as a library assistant in the children's room at the Greenfield Public Library. I worked there for almost four years, eventually becoming an assistant reference librarian, and started my masters at Simmons College. During the summer of 2014 I received a call from Judi Pulsifer, the principal of Neshobe School, saying that she had heard through the grapevine that I was a librarian and that she needed one to come work at Neshobe. Within a month I had interviewed and accepted the position, and I moved back to Vermont two weeks before the beginning of the school year.


The move from public to school librarian was a steep learning curve! I find the pace of the work to be much faster. I most deeply value the opportunity to watch and help students cultivate their reading lives throughout their elementary education. Four years into this work, I only now feel like I have a handle on all aspects of my job, and even then it is constantly shifting with the needs of my school community. I'm a teacher, a collaborator, an event planner, a grant writer, a tech leader, and more. Right now, I can't imagine doing any other work. (Hannah Fjeld, email correspondence 12/15/17)


Personal Learning and Inquiry at Neshobe


As we all know, across Vermont, personal learning is a hot topic, and school librarians are are poised to offer strategies to enable a shift from teacher centered to student center learning. Inquiry based learning is a core concept in librarianship.  Finding the right resource for each learner requires librarians to know the learner, and to help the learner frame his/her inquiry.  What could be more personal?


Hannah uses many opportunities to collaborate closely with classroom and other teachers to mesh literacy and information skills to support learning for all students.


This year, Hannah is a leader in a pilot project with several fifth/sixth grade and integrated arts teachers who have carved out time during each week for about 70 fifth and sixth graders to pursue passion projects.  


The big idea to to provide time, space, and a framework for students to self reflect about their personal interests and their own curiosities, and to build self directed explorations and performance pieces that they will eventually share with others.  According to Hannah, it has been a learning experience for both students and teachers. With the emphasis on inquiry and questioning, one surprise that she shared was that some students were unsure how process their thinking.  She heard some say, “Just tell me what to do!”  As the projects evolved, teachers divided up the students by interest areas or themes such as arts, music, technical productions, outdoors/sports, cooking, etc.  As the themes were narrowed down, the teachers then guided smaller groups through an inquiry process, and provided feedback and encouragement with each individual passion project.


As the months have gone by, the pilot project teachers are learning from their students, and are making adjustments on the fly that will inform the next rendition of this educational endeavor. This is really about improving teaching and learning for all involved-an exciting adventure in the field of education. Yes, it is hard work, but also fun!


Hannah reports:


Passion projects are a mixed bag---some students are flourishing within the choice environment, others are struggling as we didn't give much opportunity to build a mental model for the process before jumping in. We have found it necessary to split the year up into sessions with clear end dates---we are just finishing up our first session and students will start on a new project after break. It seems helpful to have a clearer timeline to help students manage their time and their progress. I'd say that, if others are thinking of doing a similar project, a scaffolded model with a slower release to full choice and freedom would benefit students and help them take full advantage of the opportunity. Also, dedicating more that 45 minutes once a week would help, but don't we always wish for more time! (Hannah Fjeld, email correspondence 12/15/17)



Making Connections with Hannah Fjeld


Perhaps you have been intrigued to learn about what is happening at Neshobe School, and would like to ask Hannah a few questions, or would like to arrange a visit.  She would welcome the opportunity to share her ideas and learning space with others in Vermont.  Networking is a key feature of the Vermont School Library Association, so let’s continue to take advantage of our collective brain, through the  listserv and the VSLA website.  


Hannah Fjeld

Library Media Specialist

Neshobe School

17 Neshobe Cir., Brandon, VT 05733

Ph: 802.247.3721 x2103

hfjeld@rnesu.org



October Spotlight:

This month the spotlight is on the Fair Haven Union High School I-Media Center, in Fair Haven, Vermont. The 9-12 school with about 450 students from area towns has a renovated learning space led by Deb Ehler-Hansen, LMS. Two years ago, the library was traditional, and now, thanks to Deb’s vision and support from her administration, it is an I-Media Center with multiple learning spaces, production spaces, quiet learning zones, comfortable seating, and resources for print and digital learning. What makes it an I-Media Center?

“The "i" in I-Media stands for innovation, information, inquiry, and interest-based learning opportunities! The i-Media Center is both the physical and VIRTUAL "HUB" of all school learning!”

That just about says it all in a nutshell! Great branding! Future ready!

The I-Media Center welcomes classroom teachers who collaborate with Deb for research projects, students who are looking for reading adventures, others who want to explore STEM learning, and more. Deb is especially excited to have about 20 students participating in a book club, and also collaborates with a history teacher to sponsor students involved in a 3D tech competition.

The I-Media website is a treasure trove of information for all users and visitors. It is truly a wonderful example of how a virtual library complements the physical space. The resources and links are useful anytime, anywhere. Spend some time scrolling through the photos and videos on the front page to get a sense of the variety of activities that make this an active learning space.

Deb is developing a makerspace area and has curated some tech tools for innovation and creativity. During the summer, she offered a two week course for high school students to explore Finch Robots, Scratch, MIT Hummingbird, Little Bits, and Makey Makey. Watch the video to see High School Prep 2017 in action. The secret she says, is to let the students take the lead in the learning. Innovation sometimes means failure, and lots of persistence!

Next on Deb’s agenda, is to provide professional development for her colleagues at FHUHS who are tasked with personalizing learning for their students. She is creating an online course to guide educators to transform learning with technology and inquiry. In November, she will be presenting her work at the AASL Conference in Phoenix. Look for more information about that and a link to her presentation in a later post.


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